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So my title is a bit strong but blindly following a process without questioning it’s value back to the organization IS a waste of time. If you cannot measure the process for success, how do you know it is a good process?

I often talk with my customers about the fact that technology is not the total solution to IT’s problems. It is a piece of the puzzle that should be incorporated into an organization’s existing processes. I think this is where most companies stop but they are missing a large piece–measurement of this process.

Organizations spend lots of time creating, managing, and fine tuning processes but I am not convinced they spend near enough time measuring the success of these processes. If I have put in a new change management process complete with a new ticketing system can I easily track:

  • Completeness of change–was the change implemented 100%
  • Was it deployed during the appropriate time frame?
  • Are there any additional changes that did not have an associated ticket?
  • How many planned changes caused an outage?

The change management process is designed to protect the business from service interruptions due to change. So can you look over the past year and determine if this did indeed happen? How many unauthorized changes did you find take place? Was it lower than the year before?

If you cannot measure the impact of a process that you are currently following, how do you know if it is working in an efficient and effective manner?

I’m not advocating processes should not be in place but I am advocating that these processes should be measured against a metric to determine if the process should be changed. Do not blindly follow a process just because it has “always been that way.”


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  • Diana Caballero

    I'm looking for information regarding Change Management Best Practice Baseline Metrics. Any thoughts?

    Thank you,